Comfrey

Herbal Supplements

Peer Reviewed

Comfrey, also called knitbone, is made primarily from the leaves of this plant. It contains Vitamins A, C, and E along with allantoin and rosmarinic acid. Allantoin may benefit wound healing and is found in the leaves and roots of the comfrey. Rosmarinic acid is reported to have anti-inflammatory properties.
Comfrey with CremeComfrey is used to treat the following: bedsores, stings, bruises, burns, dry skin, dermatitis, leg ulcers, rashes, and sunburn.

Sources of Comfrey
Comfrey is available in the following forms: ointments (5%- 20% comfrey), creams, and liniments. The leaves may be prepared as a poultice to relieve pain from sprains, pulled muscles, and broken bones.

Guidelines and Cautions
Comfrey should only be used externally. Always follow package directions. Pay strict attention to limited use guidelines on packaging.

  • Only use comfrey under the supervision of a medical professional.
  • Do not apply to broken skin.
  • Comfrey is very toxic to the liver. Preparations made from the comfrey root are 10 times more poisonous than those made from the leaves. Death from poisoning is possible.
  • Women who are pregnant or nursing should not use comfrey.

Disclaimer: Many people report feeling improvement in their condition and/or general well-being taking dietary, vitamin, mineral, and/or herbal supplements. The Editorial Board of SpineUniverse.com, however, cannot endorse such products since most lack peer-reviewed scientific validation of their claims. In most cases an appropriate diet and a "multiple vitamin" will provide the necessary dietary supplements for most individuals. Prior to taking additional dietary, vitamin, mineral, and/or herbal supplements it is recommended that patients consult with their personal physician to discuss their specific supplement requirements.

Updated on: 02/14/17
Continue Reading
Cayenne
Richard G. Fessler, MD, PhD
Many patients report feeling improvement in their general well being taking dietary supplements. The Editorial Board of SpineUniverse.com, however, cannot endorse such products since most lack peer reviewed scientific validation of their claims. In most cases an appropriate diet and a "multiple vitamin" will provide the necessary dietary supplements for most individuals. Prior to taking additional dietary supplements it is recommended that patients consult with their personal physician to discuss their specific supplement requirements.
SHOW MAIN MENU
SHOW SUB MENU
Cancel
Delete
Continue Reading:

Cayenne

Capsaicin, which makes cayenne taste hot, may help lower body temperature. Cayenne may improve circulation, lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, prevent blood clots, and heart disease.
Read More