Pau d'Arco

Herbal Supplements

Peer Reviewed

Tabebuia Tree

Pau d'arco, also called lapacho or taheebo, comes from the inner bark of Tabebuia trees native to Central and South America. This herb contains naphthoquinones - chemical compounds with antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.

Pau d'arco herbal preparations are used to treat candidiasis (vaginal and oral yeast infections), warts, ringworm, herpes simplex, flu, tumors, allergies, ulcers, diabetes, rheumatism, inflammatory bowel disease, and some cardiovascular problems.

Pau d'arco is available in the following forms: dried bark tea and extracts (alcohol and non-alcohol). Always purchase brands known for quality, as pau d'arco is not standardized.

Guidelines and Cautions
Always follow package directions.

Excessive consumption of pau d'arco may cause nausea.

Do not take pau d'arco if you have had a problem with blood clots.

Disclaimer: Many people report feeling improvement in their condition and/or general well-being taking dietary, vitamin, mineral, and/or herbal supplements. The Editorial Board of, however, cannot endorse such products since most lack peer-reviewed scientific validation of their claims. In most cases an appropriate diet and a "multiple vitamin" will provide the necessary dietary supplements for most individuals. Prior to taking additional dietary, vitamin, mineral, and/or herbal supplements it is recommended that patients consult with their personal physician to discuss their specific supplement requirements.

Updated on: 03/21/16
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Milk Thistle
Vincent Traynelis, MD
Although many patient's describe improvement in their condition after taking one of the supplements previously described, the Editorial Board is unable to endorse these supplements, as there is insufficient peer reviewed research available. Hopefully the role of these compounds will be better understood once more scientific research is compiled.
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Milk Thistle

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