All Spondylosis (Osteoarthritis) Articles

Spondylosis (Spinal Osteoarthritis) Center

Spondylosis is also known as spinal osteoarthritis. It is common and usually not serious, although it can be quite painful. Spondylosis is a degenerative condition that may worsen as a person grows older. It can affect any region of the spine: cervical (neck), thoracic (upper, mid back), lumbar (low back) or lumbosacral (low back/sacrum).

Causes of Spondylosis

Spondylosis (spinal osteoarthritis) is caused primarily by aging: As you age, the parts of your spine wear out, perhaps causing pain.

Symptoms of Spondylosis

The symptoms of spondylosis, also known as spinal osteoarthritis, vary depending on where your spine is affected. This degenerative process can cause pain that ranges from mild to severe.

Anatomy of Spondylosis

Before you can understand why spondylosis causes back pain, you should understand the parts of your spine and how they work together.

What Is Spondylosis?

Spondylosis is spinal arthritis, sometimes called osteoarthritis. It's a degenerative disorder, meaning that it's another part of aging.

Exams and Tests for Spondylosis

To make an accurate diagnosis of spondylosis, your doctor will do physical and neurological exams. You'll need to have x-rays, CT scans, or MRIs, too.

Modern Treatments for Arthritis

Learn all about modern arthritis treatments including disease modifiers, biologics that block cytokines, joint replacement, arthroplasty, and hydroxylapatite.

Spondylosis: How Doctors Treat Spinal Osteoarthritis

Spondylosis can often be treated without spine surgery. A surgeon explains how doctors diagnose this degenerative process, including what happens in physical and neurological exams. Article also discusses non-surgical treatments for spondylosis.

Arthritis: Non-surgical Treatments

Learn how exercise can help ease spinal osteoarthritis symptoms, including joint pain and stiffness, and see how it can increase flexibility, muscle strength, and endurance. Exercise also helps you maintain a healthy weight—extra weight can place too much pressure on joints.

Spondylosis (Spinal Arthritis): Reduce Back and Neck Pain

Most cases of spondylosis (also called spinal arthritis and spinal osteoarthritis) are mild and can be treated with non-surgical treatments. This article covers common symptoms and treatments for spondylosis.

Non-surgical Treatment of Spondylosis (Spinal Osteoarthritis)

Spondylosis is osteoarthritis of the spine. The symptoms may vary from mild and episodic to aggressive and painfully chronic. Fortunately, most people with spinal osteoarthritis do not need surgery. Many of the common nonoperative treatments are featured below.

Arthritis: Medications to Relieve Pain

You don't have to live with arthritis pain. Today, there is a wide variety of treatments that can help relieve the pain and discomfort of arthritis. Article reviews most common medications prescribed for arthritis.

Non-surgical Treatments for Spondylosis

Most spondylosis patients respond well to nonsurgical treatments such as medication, physical therapy, and chiropractic care.

Arthritis: Hope, But No Miracles

Arthritis treatment seems to attract charlatans peddling miracle cures. Although no miracle cures are out there, treatment and management of this disease is possible. Learn about the most common forms of arthritis.

Spondylosis

The degenerative process of spondylosis (spinal osteoarthritis) may impact the cervical, thoracic, and/or lumbar regions of the spine. This natural part of aging affects the intervertebral discs and facet joints, and it may cause pain. Learn more about it in this article.
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Spondylosis (Spinal Osteoarthritis) Center

Spondylosis is also known as spinal osteoarthritis. It is common and usually not serious, although it can be quite painful. Spondylosis is a degenerative condition that may worsen as a person grows older. It can affect any region of the spine: cervical (neck), thoracic (upper, mid back), lumbar (low back) or lumbosacral (low back/sacrum).
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