All Osteoporosis Articles

Osteoporosis Center

Osteoporosis, which means porous bone, is a serious disease that causes you to lose too much bone, make too little bone, or both. As your bones lose density, they become weaker and more likely to break.

Osteopenia and Osteoporosis: Is There a Difference?

Osteopenia is the thinning of bone mass. While this decrease in bone mass is not usually considered "severe," it is considered a very serious risk factor for the development of osteoporosis.

Calcium and Vitamin D to Build Bone

Preventing osteoporosis involves getting enough calcium and vitamin D. Calcium is what helps you build new bones, and vitamin D is what helps you absorb calcium from food or supplements.

Fall Prevention: Flooring, Furniture and Footwear

How many times have you heard that most accidents occur at home? Often! Now add to that the increased number of people who work at home.

Fall Prevention: Home and Office

How many times have you heard that most accidents occur at home? Often! Now add to that the increased number of people who work at home.

Fall Prevention Benefits All Age Groups

Injuries resulting from falls are a leading cause of back pain in North America. Be pro-active!

Fall Prevention: Be Proactive

Information to help you to take a proactive approach to preventing falls and preventing vertebral compression fractures. Especially if you have osteoporosis (low bone density), you should be aware of how to prevent falls.

Exams and Tests for Osteoporosis

There's just one way to confirm an osteoporosis diagnosis: with a bone mineral density (BMD) test. You can also have a BMD test if you might be at risk for osteoporosis. It'll tell you how strong your bones are and your chances for a fracture.

Osteoporosis and Vertebral Compression Fractures: What’s the Connection?

In people with osteoporosis, spinal fractures are more common than hip and wrist fractures. The pain from a vertebral compression fracture can be unbearable and lead to a significant reduction in quality of life.

Spinal Fractures - Spondylolisthesis - Scoliosis - Kyphosis - Lordosis

Injury, aging, general health, and lifestyle may influence the development of some conditions. Most spinal disorders are known to result from soft tissue injury, structural injury, and degenerative, or congenital conditions.

Food and Osteoporosis

There are ways to prevent osteoporosis, and eating a healthy diet is one of the easiest and most enjoyable. But unfortunately, not all foods are beneficial for your bones. In fact, some nutrients may harm your bones when consumed in high amounts.

Osteoporosis: Calcium, Vitamin D, and Prevention

Osteoporosis may develop or worsen if you do not eat a well-balanced diet that may include minerals, such as calcium and magnesium. Find out what may contribute to mineral deficiency.

Nutritional Supplements to Build Bone and Help Prevent Osteoporosis

A lack of certain minerals and vitamins play a role in the onset of osteoporosis. Adopt a healthy lifestyle to maintain sufficient levels of calcium, magnesium, and other minerals to keep bones healthy and strong.

How to Start Your Osteoporosis Prevention Plan Today

Learn 6 important things you can do to start your osteoporosis prevention program, including exercises and tips for eating a calcium-rich diet. Even if you have osteoporosis, these steps may help you keep strong bones and prevent spinal compression fractures.

Osteoporosis and Spinal Fractures: Recovery and Wellness

Steps to help you avoid osteoporosis or recover if you are undergoing treatment. Discusses the importance of what you eat (your diet should be calcium-rich, for one) and how often you exercise.
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Osteoporosis Center

Osteoporosis, which means porous bone, is a serious disease that causes you to lose too much bone, make too little bone, or both. As your bones lose density, they become weaker and more likely to break.
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