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Functional Capacity Exam

From: Zippie - on 08/01/2011 6:35pm

I was told by the nurse that they would not able to take me out of work again without a Functional Capacity Exam (FCE). I am out of work until the end of August. Has anyone here had one? What is done during it? And is it job specific? I have a job that take alot of upper body movement, lifting, pushing and pulling, looking up, down, side to side, and sorting into a case while standing. Anyone had any experience? Please only people from the US respond since. I am not sure the european fce would be applicable here.

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on 08/02/2011 1:33pm

Go here, sounds like an insurance issue to me.

What is a Functional Capacity Evaluation?

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on 08/02/2011 3:01pm

A Functional Capacity Exam is performed by the therapy department. Pain management requested the completion of the this exam but due to insurance denial, I was unable to complete (in the disability process at this time).
I was told this test is very expensive (over $1700) and time comsuming (4 hours). It was to be performed by the OT department and basically covers all movements and how you are able to care for self throughout the day.
I think more medical providers are using this to protect themselves from liability issues. If you are considering this, make sure they run this through your insurance first.
Keep us posted!

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on 08/03/2011 10:46pm

I think I could pay for it myself if necessary. I can do basic things but my job is my problem. The neck and arm movements along with the lifting are causing me spasms. So basically I could be able to pass a fce but still not be able to work my job. That is a problem.

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on 08/11/2011 3:57pm

I am not sure if you would pass the exam with the issues you are having. If the exam is 4 hours and the therapist is aware of the movements required at your job, they may focus on those movements. Just an additional thought. Good luck and let me know how it works out for you.

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on 08/17/2011 1:00pm

The best answer I found in Google is from Answers.com: == Answer ==
This is a way to see if you can do the job that you do on a daily basic. If for example you lift boxes and can't do that any more then may give you a desk job of light duty. If you file for disability this is one of a standard tests they can you to check you out.
'''Functional Capacity Evaluation:''' A series of tests measuring physical strength, ''range of motion'', stamina, and tolerance to functional activities, including lifting and carrying. These tests can be used to evaluate work tolerance, and the necessity for work restrictions. Related terms include ''Physical Capacities Evaluation'' (''PCE'') or Functional Capacity Assessment (FCA) or Work Capacity Evaluation. An evaluator skilled in Functional Capacity Evaluation will use a battery of standardized tests, designed around key factors that include diagnosis, impairment, pain and functional limitation, referral questions, and, in some instances, the case resolution goal. FCE's value to the injured individual is the focus on functional ability instead of the pain limitation associated with an impairment. It considers speed, flexibility, endurance, skill and strength through the use of functional testing, MTM, and standardized measurements to assess job-fit status. Functional Capacity Evaluation is not only a useful clinical tool, but a baseline for industry-standard results that clearly define an individual's transition from injury to employment, and from disability to deployment.

Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE) is used by physicians, case managers, and employers to transition injured workers from disability to function and employment. FCE is the single most reliable measure to determine if a successful return-to-work is possible - as it is inherently a thorough and accurate evaluation process that documents an individual's residual physical abilities, level of effort expended during testing, reliability of reports of pain and limitation, and it is an overall gauge of feasibility for employment.

In a vocational rehabilitation setting the results of Functional Capacity Evaluation are typically used to develop return-to-work plans, as the basis of an offer of alternative employment, or as the foundation for a feasibility development plan (work-focused rehabilitation); results are a sound framework for developing a Temporary Alternative Duty plan.

In a military setting the results of the Functional Capacity Evaluation are used to evaluate progress as the injured soldier transitions back to the force in the usual and customary military occupational specialty (MOS) or to measure the physical ability to reintegrate into a new specialty. It can also be used in preparation for a medical evaluation board or in transition from active duty into Veterans Administration services.

Functional Capacity Evaluation provides an important bridge from the impairment phase of medical evaluation to the disability recovery phase. While FCE provides documentation of impairment, it is best suited to the evaluation and amelioration of disability. Providing a means for a shift from the disability to vocational feasibility construct is an attainable goal with the use of FCE.

Read more:http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_does_a_functional_capacity_evaluation_test_consist_of#ixzz1VJ2bcChI

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on 08/17/2011 11:39pm

I will be having a FCE next week. I was injured on my job and had a spinal fusion March 2011. L5-s1 was fused. I do a physical job. Lifting, pushing, bending and twisting. I am a vendor for a bread company for over 8yrs. My doctor is running this to determine my disability rate and if I can return to work. At the moment I am currently only useing up to 6lbs. My job required pushing up to 200-300lbs. I'm thinking I will not be returned to work and with the type of surgery I had I would think my doctor would put permnant restrictions on me. I also have a bulging disc in upper neck and a tear at my l4-l5. All of this is due to my job. I honestly do not want to go back, I'm totally terrified of really messing up my back. I have heard the FCE is physical and does last about 4hrs, from what my PT said. Good luck to ya, let me know how it goes. I will post after I run mine and let you know how it went.

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on 08/18/2011 8:49am

Thanks for the comments and info. I have a dr appointments today. One with my nero. and one with my ortho. I really don't need a FCE until workmanship comp makes me and the pain and spine dr asked if I wanted medical retirement but the nero would have to do the paperwork. That would be my best option. I just think drs are taught to do those types of tests now to cover themselves. I'll let you know the outcome.

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on 08/23/2011 9:14pm

Saw the PA at surgeons office, surgeon was not in. He sent me back to work, but I have a second opinion scheduled with my ortho. I'll let everone know.

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on 08/24/2011 2:57pm

If your doctor gives you restrictions and you are limited from work then it's up to either worker's comp or your disability insurance, (if you are on either), to pay for the FCE if they want one. If your doctor won't give you restrictions without one then you have to pay...I'm not sure if your medical insurance will pay but I doubt it. Personally I think it's a bit excessive for the doctor to expect you to have one before he will give restrictions, he should know what you can and can't do well enough. I used to work for an insurance company as a Senior Disability Claims Analyst and we usually requested these to see if we could get a person off disability and back to work. They were very helpful in working out accommodations at the workplace.

Good luck...my understanding is that the test can be taxing but also helpful, (depending on what the person who requested it wants to accomplish).

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on 08/24/2011 5:50pm

Thanks , that is good information.

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on 09/06/2011 7:21pm

Had my FCE and the results were I'm at sedentary with limitations which means can't do much but a sit down job. My PT is doing work conditioning but not sure what work comp will say when they see the results. I was injured on the job and had fusion surgery in March 2011. My job is very physical so not sure what they are going to do with me

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on 09/07/2011 8:58pm

Breadgirl, hope you are doing ok. I hope they do what is right by you at work. Do you have a lawyer? I didn' t do a FCE and went back to work. I am getting a second opinion Oct. 6 and it is with my ortho. I have been having lower back problems also and they have a physical therapy dept also. Well, we will have to see. What did they have you do during the FCE? I would like to know.

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on 09/08/2011 12:32pm

Zippie, Yes I got an attorney the moment I became injured. For my the FCE was a bit rough. They had me doing some hand manipulation(hand eye cordination) the easier part of the test. I also had to carry a metal box around, put it on a shelf high and low shelfs. They also put weights in it and the most I could tolerate was 5lbs. Still recovering from my surgery, just coming along slowly. I am going to be doing work conditioning to see if they can build me up to beable to come back to work. My PT says it could take 6-8wks. They are going to see how I'm doing after 3wks. I just have to see how things go. Good Luck to you. Have you had a MRI run yet? If you end up having surgery, make sure you have a consultation from a surgeon who only does spine surgery.

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