Johns Hopkins pain management specialist recommends Calmare Therapy for RSD pain

Scrambler therapy can overcome severe neuropathy

Preface: Three years ago, my team and I conducted an exhaustive search looking for a new drug-free therapy (with no patient side effects, which was FDA cleared) to help combat treatment-resistant chronic pain.

We eventually (unanimously) agreed that Calmare's scrambler therapy was a new technology that offered long-term pain relief with no debilitating side effects to patients, who had suffered too much already.

Today, this therapy is minimizing or even eliminating chronic neuropathy in patients living with failed back surgery, chronic spine pain, chemotherapy-induced pain, reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD  / CRPS  /  fibromyalgia). I'd like to share a story about Amy, a patient suffering from severe chronic pain after a failed neck surgery which had left her virtually bedridden.

My message is that regardless of the pain therapy you choose, keep in mind there are treatments that do not involve expensive and debilitating drugs or invasive treatments such as spinal cord stimulators. Keep looking, talk to doctors, keep up with the new research. There is a solution out there to minimize your pain.

About Amy and her pain
Forty-six-year-old Amy Horwitz is a bigger-than-life, vivacious, “mover and shaker.”  When complications from a 2010 neck surgery left her immobilized and bedridden, her life was turned upside down.  No longer the care-free, independent woman she used to be, Amy become dependent on a cane or walker to get around, and her husband quit his job to care for her.

Amy during her scrambler therapy treatment.




"I felt like I had a boa constrictor going around my legs. I felt pain everywhere from my head to my toes," Amy explains. "My pain was literally off the charts."

Former pharma tech is handed scripts for painkillers
Amy visited several highly regarded medical specialists, including an orthopedist and a neurosurgeon. But instead of receiving a diagnosis, she was told that her pain was psychogenic (in the mind) and she received a myriad of prescriptions for antidepressants, muscle relaxants and strong narcotics, including the highly addictive OxyContin.


Amy's hand before Calmare Therapy

Amy's hand before Calmare therapy

As a former pharmaceutical tech, Amy was well aware of the debilitating side effects of these narcotics, some of which she had experienced firsthand. “I wanted relief─but did not want to live my life dependent on expensive and dangerous pain medications,” says Amy.

Amy and her husband face the source of her chronic pain–head-on
With the support of her husband, they conducted extensive research of her symptoms on the Internet and agreed in their mutual self-diagnosis of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), which was later confirmed by an RSD specialist at John Hopkins Blaustein Pain Treatment Center. After hearing of Amy’s desire for a drug-free solution to her chronic pain, her doctor  recommended a newer treatment for pain that tricks the brain’s pain signal and is showing great results for RSD sufferers–Calmare Therapy.

Calmare uses a biophysical (using physical methods to treat biological problems) rather than a biochemical (drugs) approach to pain management. It is a pain-free, non-invasive treatment for nerve pain that uses electrodes placed on the skin to deliver a ‘no-pain’ message directly to the nerve.

Amy's hand after treatment.

Amy's hand after treatment

When Amy first arrived at my office,  her pain was a 10/10 on the Pain Scale. After nine daily  sessions, her pain level dropped to 2/10.

“The swelling on my hands had gone down and the pain in my legs had significantly improved. I am finally able to move on my own. I can honestly say I feel like myself again for the first time in years,” says Amy. She is still amazed by the fact that she can grab a glass and put ice in it herself. “It is an incredible feat for me,” laughs Amy.

While Amy is not completely pain-free, she says she can finally see “the light at the end of the tunnel.”  She does not know what her future will bring. She hopes to try yoga and ride a rollercoaster again. But one thing she knows for sure is that, “I’m moving and shaking once again and nothing is ever going to derail me from enjoying this wonderful life.”